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Other WWI design ventures.

In 1916 the Royal Flying Corp was short of fighting Scouts, with speed and agility to report on enemy concentrations . Fokker monoplanes with synchronised machine guns were taking extensive tolls over the battlelines. The old B.E.2c was redesigned as a single seat fighter, the B.E.12 but it was such a poor performer Sir Douglas Haig condemned its use on the Western Front.

Captain Barnwell had been designing a monoplane using all the points gained from flying the excellent Scout D, the prototype M.IA arrived in June 1916. First flown by the freelance test pilot Fred P raynham it achieved 132 mph, he even flew under the Clifton Suspension bridge. At a time when the average speed for a fighter was much less this was a significant triumph. Much to the dismay of many pilots and especially the company that even with a Vickers synchronised gun the Ministry still had doubts about the strength of monoplane wings. They only ordered 125 and these saw service in the Middle East or became the personal hacks for senior flying officers. Its potential was never tested. Following the war many were sold and the company bought back four. One went to Australia with Captain Harry Butler AFC

Many of the early aeroplane builders had learned their skils producing bicycles and it would have seemed a natural progression to adapt thos skills to aircraft. Thin walled carbon steel tubing brazed and soldered made for good lightweight joints. Barnwell designed an aircraft that could utilise these ideas but left the detail to W T Reid who translated the drawing into a duralumin monocoque fuselage, one of the first examples of double skin construction. Two prototypes were built and the aircrafts ability to carry a disposable load of 40% of its all up weight was significant as was the construction methos very few specialised tooling which would enable quantity production. Unfortunatly Captain Barnwell crashed one on his approach to Farnborough and it was never rebuilt. His poor flying ability was legendary.

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This is page 12 of FILTON - THE AIRCRAFT.
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M.IA - Type 10

M.IA - Type 10
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M.IC - Type 20

M.IC - Type 20
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The M.R.I. - A.58623 - Type 13

The M.R.I. - A.58623 - Type 13
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