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Women workers prove themselves

By July 1917 such was the success of the Bristol Fighter that the War Office decided to provide as many flying units as possible with these aircraft. Arrangements were introduced to allow additional, unskilled, women to produce the aircraft. Special jigs were hastily designed by John Daniel and Frank Davey to enable women to do this. These were very successful.

By September 1917 it was decided to utilise other local engineering industrial establishments to meet demand. The British and Colonial Aeroplane Company (as the more familiar Bristol Aeroplane Company was known at that time) utilised the tramways engineering works at Brislington. Here women worked in the Final Assembly Hall, in the Carpenter Shop and Cabinet Shop, and as wing assemblers. Over 2,000 aircraft were produced during 1918 from the Filton and Brislington works.

Orders for the Bristol Fighter continued to rise; 800 were requested in September 1917, and 1,200 ordered in March 1918. To meet these unprecedented demands further expansion of the works was done at a cost of £88,000.

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This is page 2 of The Developing Role Of Women In Aviation.
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Women in the cabinet shop

Women in the cabinet shop
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Women assembling Bristol Fighters

Women assembling Bristol Fighters
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Women working in the wood detail sheds

Women working in the wood detail sheds
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