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The aftermath of the blaze

The following morning dawned dank and foggy and all that remained of the aircraft was a pile of sodden aluminium ash amongst which could be discerned a few recognisable objects: some survival handbooks and a flight test observers stop watch (stopped!). Some small cans turned out to be the remains of cockpit instruments.Analysis of the remains revealed that the LP compressor drive shaft had failed due to fatigue cracks through oil drain holes in the stiffening bands on the centre section of the shaft. This had resulted in a further failure at the LP turbine bearing and consequent ejection of the LP turbine disk.Following the loss of XA894 testing reverted to the test cells on fixed beds but this lost much of the flexibility needed when at the forefront of this new supersonic technology. A replacement Vulcan was allocated but politics determined the outcome. The TSR2 project itself was cancelled and all the jigs and tooling were then destroyed. This brought to an end further flight research until the need for testing the Olympus 593 for Concorde, when another Vulcan was pressed into service.

This is page 3 of Vulcan - Olympus engine Test Bed - on Fire.
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Goodbye to a new fire truck

Goodbye to a new fire truck
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The olympus static test beds in the 1950's

The olympus static test beds in the 1950's
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The TSR2 cancelled and broken up

The TSR2 cancelled and broken up
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